PET CARE TIPS

Introducing a New Cat to Your Home

Microchipping a Pet

Free and Low Cost Spay/Neuter

 

Introducing a New Cat to Your Home

Slow and steady wins the race.

Jordan3New adopters are sometimes unsure about how to best introduce a new cat into a household with an existing cat or dog. Sometimes there can be friction with a current pet who may be upset by the presence and smell of a new cat.

Most important is to give plenty of attention to the pet who has lived in your home, and take things slow with introducing the new cat.

Here are some step-by-step tips.

 

  • Introducing by smell:  If you can, bring a blanket belonging to the new cat to your home so your cat can get used to the new cat’s smell, and vice versa.
  • Keep new kitty in a separate room:  When the new kitty arrives, immediately take them in their carrier to a separate room. Let them  out of the carrier but close the door. Give them everything they will need: litter box, water, food, a bed. Your cat will know that someone is there.
  • Feed on both sides of a door: At meal time, put their food bowls on opposite sides of the door.  While they are eating they will hear and smell each other. Cats enjoy eating, so they will associate the new sounds and smells with a pleasurable activity.
  • Switch their rooms:  In a day or so, switch the cats. Put Kitty 1 in Kitty 2’s room and vice versa. They now can explore the other cat’s area and become more  comfortable with the smells. Do this for intervals of 30 minutes to an hour.
  • Let them spend some time together. There will be hissing, but you will notice as days go by the hissing will decrease.

Most importantly give lots of extra attention to your cat.  Slow and steady wins the race.
For more tips check out www.hsus.org  and www.thecattherapist.com 

 

Microchipping a Pet – Why and How

All pets adopted from A Tail at a Time are microchipped.

Dog adopted in Brooklyn by A Tail at a Time - SashaFrom the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC Animals:

Having your pet microchipped is one of the best ways to increase your pet’s chances of getting home if he or she is lost or stolen and winds up at an animal shelter or veterinary office.

Unlike dog tags and collars, which can fall off or be removed, microchipping is a more permanent form of identifying your dog or cat. 

Make sure your pets can find their way home…microchip them!

How does it work?

A tiny capsule about the size of a grain of rice is injected under the  loose skin on the back of your pet’s neck. The procedure provides no  more discomfort than a vaccination.

What do I have to do?

Register the chip. This is extremely important! If your vet does not  submit the paperwork for you, make sure YOU complete the form and mail  it to the company.  And even if your vet submits the paperwork for you,  it’s a good idea to follow up with the company to make sure the chip was registered correctly. (If you have your dog or cat microchipped at a  Mayor’s Alliance low-cost microchipping clinic, the Mayor’s Alliance  will submit the paperwork for you.)

I’ve lost my microchipped pet. Now what?

If your dog or cat becomes lost and turns up at a shelter or vet’s  office, a scanner can be used to read the digital number on the chip. A phone call to the microchip company to which you registered the microchip provides the shelter or vet with your contact information, and  you can be contacted to retrieve your pet.

Where can I have my pet microchipped?

The Mayor’s Alliance holds low-cost microchipping clinics at events  throughout the year where you can have your dog(s) or cat(s) microchipped for only $25 each. Visit The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC Animals.

If you’d like to host a microchipping clinic in your neighborhood, please contact info@AnimalAllianceNYC.org.

 

You can also ask your veterinarian or local animal shelter for advice  about microchipping and prices.

 

Free and Low Cost Spay/Neuter in NYC

A Tail at a Time adoption fees includes the cost of spay/neuter.

Mona's babies_CleanedOrig

By spaying and neutering your pet, you can help stop overpopulation and help your pet live a longer and healthier life.

In NYC shelters alone approximately 10,000 dogs and cats are killed simply because there are not enough homes to account for the overwhelming number of pets in need.

 You can confirm with your vet or spay/neuter provider that this is the right time to spay or neuter your pet. Help reduce shelter overcrowding!

ASPCA Mobile Spay/Neuter Clinic

$5 spay/neuter, rabies and distemper vaccination, nail trim, e-collar, and microchip on a mobile clinic in all five boroughs with proof of public assistance, and $125 per animal if you are not on public assistance.

For information and clinic dates and locations, visit ASPCA Mobile Spay/Neuter Clinic or call 877-SPAY-NYC (877-772-9692).

Mayor’s Alliance for NYC Animals

$5 spay/neuter, rabies and distemper vaccination, nail trim, and e-collar on a mobile clinic in all five boroughs with proof of public assistance, and $125 per animal if you are not on public assistance. Pit Bull, Pit mix, or large mixed breed dog are eligible for free spay/neuter surgery, rabies and distemper vaccinations, regardless of your financial need.

Visit The Mayor’s Alliance for NYC Animals or call (877) SPAY-NYC (877-772-9692), press 1 for English, then 6 for an appointment. Monday–Friday, 3:00–8:00 p.m., and Saturday 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

The Toby Project

Free and honor system spay/neuter at a mobile clinic in all five boroughs. For information and clinic dates/locations, please visit  The Toby Project   or call (212) 799-1120.

 

 

Menu